Journal of Managerial Issues


Click on the links below to learn more about the Journal of Managerial Issues.
  • About the JMI
  • Statement of Purpose
  • Staff and Review Board
  • Call for Reviewers
  • Ordering & Subscription Information
  • Editorial Policy
  • Review Philosophy & Process
  • Call for Manuscripts
  • Guidelines for Submission of Manuscripts
  • Abstracting and Listing Sources
  • Recent Issue
  • Annual Index

Goal of JMI

The purpose of the Journal of Managerial Issues is to contribute to the advancement of business knowledge by publishing high-quality basic and applied research across the functional areas of business. Its primary goal is to disseminate the results of new and original scholarly activity to a broad audience consisting of university faculty and administrators, business executives, consultants, and governmental managers. The Journal was established as a means to disseminate the latest information and findings of both the academic and business communities, and to act as a bridge between them.

Correspondence

The Journal of Managerial Issues (ISSN 1045-3695) is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by Pittsburg State University. Manuscripts are welcome for consideration and should be submitted to jmi@pittstate.edu.


Send Correspondence To:

Dr. Sang-Heui Lee, Editor in Chief
Journal of Managerial Issues
Kelce College of Business
Pittsburg State University
1701 S. Broadway
Pittsburg, KS 66762-7533
Phone: 620-235-4575
slee@pittstate.edu
*Submissions should be sent to jmi@pittstate.edu

Request permission to reuse this content please.  

The purpose of the Journal of Managerial Issues is to contribute to the advancement of business knowledge by publishing high-quality basic and applied research across the functional areas of business. Its primary goal is to disseminate the results of new and original scholarly activity to a broad audience consisting of university faculty, business executives, consultants, and government managers. The Journal also acts as a bridge between the academic and business communities.

The Journal is interested in research which:
  1. Formulates and explores new conceptual models.
  2. Reports relevant survey research findings.
  3. Integrates or synthesizes different fields of understanding.
  4. Tests work-related hypotheses of practical significance.
  5. Evaluates the results of field experiments and case studies.
  6. Summarizes and evaluates areas of new understanding.
  7. Presents new insights into major issues within the field of management and organizations.

Contributions from both the general trend of contemporary scholarship as well as those not following orthodoxy are welcomed.

The JMI is directed to both academics and practitioners. It is interested in cultivating a readership of university faculty and administrators, business executives, and governmental administrators.

The JMI seeks the following types of articles: those that have direct practical application to business; articles that, though not necessarily applied in nature, would be of interest to both business managers and academics; and those that explore public policy issues related to business. Articles should be scholarly but not overly technical or specialized. It should not be assumed that the readers are completely familiar with the concepts and terminology of a specific subject under study.

The goal of the JMI is to disseminate the results of new and original findings of both the academic and the business community, and, of particular importance, to serve as a bridge between them.

Articles published in JMI have traditionally come from a wide variety of universities and institutions. Recent issues have included authors from universities such as:

Universities:

Michigan State University
Florida State University
Oklahoma State University
James Madison University
Boston College
Xavier University
University of Virginia
University of Massachusetts
University of Alabama
University of Georgia
University of Missouri
University of Tennessee
University of Tennessee – Chattanooga
University of Central Florida
University of South Florida – St. Petersbug
University of Houston – Clear Lake
University of North Carolina – Greensboro
University of New Castle
University of Northern Colorado
North Dakota State University
Eastern Michigan University
Baruch College
Middle Tennessee State University
Chulalongkorn University
Louisiana Tech University
McNeese State University
University of Windsor
Murray State University
Widener University
Suffolk University

Institutions:

Ernst & Young
Wisconsin Management Group
Citizens Financial Group
Sloan Agency on Aging
Korn/Ferry International
Center for Creative Leadership

Abstracting and Listing Sources:

The Journal of Managerial Issues is abstracted and listed by:

  • ABI/INFORM
  • AUBER Bibliography
  • The Author's Guide to Accounting and Financial Reporting Publications
  • Business Index
  • Cabell's Directory of Publishing Opportunities in Business and Economics
  • Cambridge Scientific Abstracts
  • The College Media Directory
  • Current Index to Journals in Education
  • EBSCO's MasterFILE
  • Gale Directory of Publications and Broadcast Media
  • Human Resource Abstracts
  • Information Science Abstracts
  • IAC InSite
  • International Guide to Accounting Journals
  • International Political Science Abstracts
  • Journal Search -- Directory of Business Publications
  • JSTOR
  • National Directory of Advertising--Print Media
  • National Directory of Mailing Lists
  • National Directory of Newsletters
  • Operations Research/Management Science: An International Literature Digest
  • Oxbridge Directories on the Web -- MediaFinder
  • Oxbridge Directory of Newsletters
  • PAIS Bulletin; PAIS Select
  • Psychological Abstracts
  • PsycINFO database
  • PsycLIT database
  • Public Administration Abstracts
  • Quality Control and Applied Statistics: An International Literature Digest
  • Sociological Abstracts
  • Standard Periodical Directory
  • Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory
  • University Microfilms, Inc.

Editor in Chief
Sang-Heui Lee

Assistant Editor
Irene Robinson

Consulting Editors
Donald E. Baack
Eric G. Harris
Stephen Horner
Lynn Murray

Founder & Editor in Chief 1989-2008
Charles C. Fischer

Editorial Review Board
Click here for Editorial Review Board Members

Call for Ad Hoc Reviewers

We wish to add reviewers in all management and management-related disciplines -- accounting, finance, marketing, management information systems, management, psychology, sociology, etc. If you would like to serve as an ad hoc reviewer for the journal, please fill out the Reviewers Information Form and mail it back to me. Your reviewing responsibilities would be no more than one manuscript per year.

Please note that as Board positions open up, replacement Board Members are selected from our pool of ad hoc reviewers.

You may contact me by postal mail, telephone, Fax, or E-mail:

Sang-Heui Lee, Editor in Chief
Journal of Managerial Issues
Pittsburg State University
Pittsburg, KS 66762
Phone: 620-235-4575
slee@pittstate.edu
*Submissions should be sent to jmi@pittstate.edu

A one year subscription to the Journal of Managerial Issues consists of the four quarterly issues mailed to your address. To subscribe, send a check or money order* (payable to PSU/Journal of Managerial Issues) to the following address:

Irene Robinson, Assistant Editor
Journal of Managerial Issues
Department of Economics, Finance and Banking
Pittsburg State University
1701 S. Broadway
Pittsburg, KS 66762-7533
Phone: 620-235-4547


USA Individual:

  • $95 for one year
  • $180 for two years
  • $260 for three years

USA Institutions:

  • $115 for one year
  • $220 for two years
  • $320 for three years.

International:

  • $190 for one year
  • $370 for two years
  • $545 for three years.

Back Issues/Reprints:

$30 per back issue or $20 per article reprint. Payment must be received in advance of mailing back issues and reprints. Check or money order should be made payable to: Pittsburg State University/JMI and mailed to address listed above.

*For libraries, the Journal of Managerial Issues is listed with the following subscription agencies: EBSCO, Faxon, Dawson, Swets, ISA, Martinus Nijhoff International, Blackwell's, JSTOR, Popular Subscription Services, Global Information Distribution Corp. Ltd., among others.

The Journal of Managerial Issues seeks to publish the highest quality business research across the functional areas of business. The emphasis of the journal is on empirical work, though conceptual and methodological works are occasionally accepted for publication. The overriding criterion for publication in the JMI is the knowledge readers will gain about the theory and practice of business management. The JMI is intended to foster research from a variety of business school and related disciplines. As such, the JMI is open to, and encourages a wide range of emerging and established methods, approaches, and problem areas within the domain of business research. Articles accepted for publication must present substantive and significant managerial implications.

Articles published are not necessarily the opinions of the JMI, the editors, or Pittsburg State University. Statements by authors appearing in the Journal are the exclusive responsibility of the authors themselves. Authors are allowed to express their opinions with the intention being to encourage and stimulate a free flow of ideas.

Each paper submitted to the JMI is processed as follows:

  1. Receipt of the manuscript is acknowledged promptly by a letter from the Editor. An initial screening is made by the Editor to determine the suitability of the article. Key factors considered are the quality of the research methodology; the ability to communicate to university faculty and business leaders; and, most important, the potential contribution to the advancement of knowledge directly related to the theory of organizations and the practice of management.
  2. Assuming the manuscript is suitable for consideration by the JMI, it is assigned to two (or more) "external" referees, according to its functional and methodological content. Manuscripts are "doubleblind" reviewed by referees selected by the Editor.
  3. Each referee provides a careful evaluation of the manuscript, makes a recommendation to the Editor, and supplies comments for the author.
  4. The Editor appraises the reviews and makes a final decision regarding publication of the article. Every effort is made to obtain prompt reviews and make early decisions (about eight to ten weeks) regarding publication or suggested revision of the manuscript.


Readers' comments on articles appearing in the Journal of Managerial Issues are welcome and will be considered for publication in the correspondence section. Such comments must be limited to 1,000 words; any replies from authors must be similarly limited.

The JMI seeks to publish quality empirical, theoretical and methodological papers in business management research. The overriding criterion for publication in the JMI is knowledge gained about the theory of organizations and the practices of management. The JMI is intended to foster research from a variety of business school and related disciplines. As such, it is open to, and indeed encourages, a wide range of emerging methods, conceptual approaches and substantive problem areas within the domain of business behavior. The goal is to make the JMI an open-minded, fair and receptive vehicle for quality business research, regardless of the method, theory, or disciplinary origin. The editorial review process is the mechanism through which that goal can be achieved or thwarted.

A key feature of the review process is the attempt to apply consistent quality standards across diverse research by relying on reviewers representing disciplines characterized by certain methods and approaches and by calling on appropriate ad hoc reviewers. The goal is to obtain the best match possible between authors and reviewers.

Procedurally, it is important to arrive at a decision on a manuscript in a timely and constructive fashion, with a minimum of iterations. The goal is to reach the initial editorial decision on a manuscript within 60 days of submission. Another goal is to try to provide enough direction to authors when requesting a revision so that one revision should be sufficient to make a final decision on most manuscripts; multiple iterations of revision and review are a frustration for all concerned. Clearly, these two goals will not be attained for every manuscript, but the intent is to meet these objectives for as high a proportion of submissions as is feasible.

One approach for minimizing the number of iterations is the concept of forming a "blind partnership" between reviewers and authors, so that all parties are working toward the same goal of disseminating interesting knowledge about business behavior. Some journals take the position that it is the Editor's job to accept manuscripts, while it is the reviewer's job to reject them. This position is unnecessarily adversarial and counterproductive. So many hurdles can be erected from a variety of perspectives that the process hinders rather than facilitates dissemination of knowledge. Although it is imperative to avoid any relaxation in scholarly standards, it should be possible for reviewers to cooperate with the Editor to identify any truly meritorious (i.e., knowledge-generating) aspects of an otherwise flawed manuscript.

The assignment of (typically) two reviewers to a manuscript to be evaluated is made on the basis of attempting to provide the highest quality reviewers possible for that manuscript. A key to assuring review quality is a good "match" of the reviewer's interest and the content of the manuscript. If a reviewer receives a manuscript that he or she feels unqualified to evaluate properly, the manuscript should be promptly returned to the Editor with a note to that effect. Thus, pursuit of the objective of providing quality reviews on any manuscript begins with the Editor's decision regarding the most qualified reviewers. The remainder of the burden, though, rests on the reviewer.

Each article submitted to the JMI is subjected to the following reviewing process:

  1. An initial screening by the Editor to determine the suitability of the article for the Journal.
  2. Assuming it is suitable, it is assigned to two referees, according to its functional and methodological content.
  3. A careful review by two referees, each of whom makes a recommendation to the Editor and supplies comments for the author.
  4. An appraisal of the reviews by the Editor, who makes an initial decision regarding publication of the paper and transmits the reviews and this decision to the author. If the Editor feels the paper has potential for publication, the author is invited to make revisions according to the referees' suggestions.
  5. A final decision by the Editor, who appraises the entire review process, making certain that all revisions suggested by the referees prerequisite to publication have been made.

The Editor reserves the right to deviate from the above procedures when circumstances suggest that it would be most appropriate to do so.

Components of a "Quality" Review

A quality review is necessarily defined as a review that is helpful to the Editor in making a decision about the disposition of a manuscript. Additionally, and even more important, is the guidance provided in the review to the Editor and the author(s) regarding modifications that may improve the manuscript. Finally, and perhaps most important, is the role of the review in facilitating the dissemination of interesting knowledge about business behavior through the pages of the JMI. A brief discussion of the components of a "quality" review follows.

Critical Evaluation
The sine qua non of a quality review is rigorous evaluation of the manuscript. All major assertions, claims, analyses, etc., should be considered in detail for clarity, correctness, and conciseness. It is appropriate in conducting this critical evaluation to note both positive and negative aspects of the manuscript. Authors need to know what they have done well and not just what they have done poorly. The critical evaluation must be communicated clearly, persuasively and in enough detail to convey the basis for the evaluation. In a sense, the reviewer is in the position of trying to convince the Editor and the author(s) of the particular points raised in the review.

Promptness
A second vital component of a quality review is the promptness with which it is delivered. The JMI's goal is to reach the initial decision on a manuscript within 60 days of the date of submission. In order to reach this objective, reviewers must complete their portion of the task within four to six weeks. Agreeing to take on a JMI review assignment, then, is implicitly an agreement to prioritize that review sufficiently so that it can be delivered in time to be helpful.

Constructiveness
The popular view of the role of reviewers is that they are to serve as "gatekeepers," separating the wheat from the chaff. Unfortunately, this view focuses attention on the evaluative aspect of the reviewer's role. Viewing the review as a constructive process designed to maximize the potential contribution of a piece of work reveals the more challenging and more satisfying aspect of the review process. It is one thing to write a review that condemns a flawed research effort; it is something beyond that to point out an avenue for salvaging the meritorious portion of that research.

One cautionary qualification exists with respect to this constructive process, and that is the temptation to attempt to force the author(s) to write the paper "in one's own image." The research is the property of the author(s), and while serious consideration must be given to reviewers' comments, the author(s) will not be "held hostage" by a reviewer's ideas when a disagreement exists that is a matter of opinion rather than one of fact.

Fairness and Impartiality
A key to a quality review is the attempt by the reviewer to be impartial and fair-minded in his or her evaluation. If a reviewer cannot compartmentalize his or her evaluation process from the desire to defend a "pet" theory; to exercise hostility toward the supposed author(s); or simply to reject the manuscript out-of-hand on philosophical grounds, etc., then the reviewer should disqualify himself or herself from the review. The review process must be characterized by fairness, open-mindedness, and impartiality to as great an extent as is humanly possible.

Diplomacy
A quality review is one in which negative evaluations of the manuscript are delivered as diplomatically as possible. Criticisms can be delivered in a gentle, constructive fashion rather than through the use of inflammatory language. In all cases, comments must be directed only to the manuscript and not at the author(s), their assumed motives, or lack of competence. An insulting or patronizing review not only damages the JMI's reputation, but also fails to achieve the goal of communicating with the author(s). A good rule of thumb is to write the review as though it were not "blind," and the reviewers are known to the author(s).

Confidentiality
The JMI, like many other journals, operates on a "double blind" basis. The authors are not informed of the identity of the reviewers, nor are the authors identified to the reviewers, except as their identities can be ascertained by reading the manuscript. It is a violation of professional ethics and the author's right to privacy to discuss a JMI manuscript with anyone else. Occasions will arise when a reviewer may wish to consult with a colleague who is more proficient in a particular area; such consultation is acceptable (even laudable) but should be limited. What is of greater concern is the need to avoid "gossip" about one's most recent JMI review, especially when the (supposed) author(s) are identified in the conversation. It is not fair to the author(s), or the Editor, or the Journal when reviewers discuss that which the JMI has promised will remain confidential.

Thoroughness
A high quality review is thorough in all aspects of both the evaluative process and the communication process. Principle aspects of the manuscript that need to be addressed by reviewers are clarity of objectives, conceptual rigor, methodological rigor, logical organization, treatment of relevant literature, discussion of results, readability, length-contribution ratio, significance of topic, and significance of contribution.

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Concluding Remarks: The Importance of Dedicated Reviewers

Without the dedicated efforts of reviewers, the JMI could not be a top-quality journal. While it is true that any journal is only as good as the authors who contribute their research to it, it is also true that a good journal is made better by the reviewers who labor on behalf of it. The reviewing process is much more than "gate keeping," it is, at its heart, a "value-added" mechanism that helps to strengthen the overall contribution to knowledge made in the pages of JMI.

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To maintain a broad scope of issues covered in JMI, we encourage the submission of manuscripts in all business and business-related disciplines. Manuscripts should have both an academic and managerial/ practitioner orientation, with the former involving a review of the literature, and empirical investigation and/or new conceptual developments. To get a better understanding of the type of articles we desire, you may access them on-line through such full-text databases as ABI/INFORM, Information Access, Bigchalk.com, etc.

Administrative Fee

Please note that to help defray the administrative costs of publishing the Journal of Managerial Issues, a payment of $100 (up to 25 pages; $30 per page thereafter) will be due if your article is accepted for publication. Payment of this fee will entitle you to receive a one-year complimentary subscription to the journal (which has an individual subscription price of $95 for 2016), starting with the issue your article appears in. Each author will receive four copies of that first issue. 

This is not a submission fee.  There is no charge if your paper is not accepted for publication in JMI.

Administrative Fee: $100

Please note that to help defray the administrative costs of publishing the Journal of Managerial Issues, a payment of $100 (up to 25 pages, $30 per page thereafter) will be due if your article is accepted for publication. Payment of this fee will entitle you to receive a one-year complimentary subscription to the journal, starting with the issue your article appears in. Each author will receive four copies of that first issue. Each subsequent issue (three in all) will be sent to the corresponding author only, unless you direct us otherwise. This is not a submission fee. There is no charge if your paper is not accepted for publication in JMI.

Guidelines for Submission of Manuscripts

All submissions must adhere to these requirements. Submissions that deviate from these guidelines may receive desk rejections. If in doubt consult The Chicago Manual of Style.

Manuscripts may be submitted for consideration by sending an e-mail file attachment to jmi@pittstate.edu

Format – Type double-spaced papers with one inch margins, on 8½”x11” paper, using 12 pt. Times New Roman font. Place each figure, table, reference list, and abstract on a separate page; number pages after the first. Cover page should list title and name, position, affiliation, and mailing address of each author. On second page, include title and abstract. Submissions will not be returned. 

Voice – Use the passive voice rather than the active, third person rather than first. 

Title – Title should be specific, no more than fifteen words. 

Abstract – Brief, no more than 250 words, that sets forth the main point of the paper. Three to five keywords must be supplied with the abstract, and field(s) of specialization (e.g., strategic mgmt.., org. behavior, etc.) 

Length – Limit of 25 pages -- text pages, references, and tables/figures (cover and abstract pages not counted). You may exceed this limit by no more than 10 pages for a fee of $30 per page over 25. The maximum length of 35 pages would cost $300, plus the $100 administrative fee. This is to help defray extra production costs. 

Footnotes are discouraged and should be put in the main text where possible. 

Tables and Figures – Each should include a number and a title centered over. Use Arabic numbers for tables and Roman numbers on figures. Text should include a reference and placement of each. Place each figure/table on a separate sheet at the end. 

Headings – Topical headings (centered, bold, all caps) and subheadings (at left margin, bold) should be used. Sub-subheadings should be indented and part of the paragraph, bold, and italicized, with a period at the end. 

Student Samples It is the position of JMI that while student samples in business research may be appropriate in certain situations, it is critical that the sampling method be appropriate for the research question under investigation. Authors should carefully consider the appropriateness of student samples and present valid arguments for their use. 

Text Citations – Cite references in the body of the text:

  • Author’s name is in text, follow with year in parentheses -- “...James (1988) claims that...”
  • Author’s name not in text, last name, comma, and year- - “...some have argued (Thompson, 1972) that ...”
  • Pagination (if needed) follows year, separated by a colon -- “...it has been claimed (Smith, 1984: 32) that ...”
  • Two authors, give both names joined by “and” (not the symbol “&”); three or more use “et al.” -- “...another version (Chad and Barney, 1983) ...”; and “...it has been claimed (Bright et al., 1979) that ...”
  • More than one reference to same author and year, use “a”, “b”, etc. in text and reference -- “...as was previously asserted (Lissner, 1989a: 12) ...”
  • Authorless articles or studies, use name of journal or sponsoring organization, not title of article -- “...has been claimed (American Law Review, 1988) that ...”

References – The references should include only the most relevant work. The author should make sure that there is a strict “one-to-one correspondence” between the names (years) in the text and those on the list. Do not include unpublished work. References should follow the format below:

  • Books: Bright, S. M. 1985. New Marketing Developments. New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.
  • Journals: Jade, C. J., and C. C. Fish. 1987. “The Choice among Debt, Equity, and Convertible Bonds.” The Journal of Finance 29 (October): 139-51.
  • Three or More Authors: Smith, T. J., V. Height, and C. B. Lucas. 1951. Work Transformed. New York, NY: Basic Books.
  • Article in Book Edited by a Different Author: Mikels, N. D. 1981. “Understanding Entrepreneurship.” In Contemporary Entrepreneurship. Ed. J. Schick. Ann Arbor, MI: Hanover Press.

The Journal of Managerial Issues is abstracted and listed by:

  • ABI/INFORM
  • AUBER Bibliography
  • The Author's Guide to Accounting and Financial Reporting Publications
  • Business Index
  • Cabell's Directory of Publishing Opportunities in Business and Economics
  • Cambridge Scientific Abstracts
  • The College Media Directory
  • Current Index to Journals in Education
  • EBSCO's MasterFILE
  • Gale Directory of Publications and Broadcast Media
  • Human Resource Abstracts
  • Information Science Abstracts
  • IAC InSite
  • International Guide to Accounting Journals
  • International Political Science Abstracts
  • Journal Search -- Directory of Business Publications
  • JSTOR
  • National Directory of Advertising--Print Media
  • National Directory of Mailing Lists
  • National Directory of Newsletters
  • Operations Research/Management Science: An International Literature Digest
  • Oxbridge Directories on the Web -- MediaFinder
  • Oxbridge Directory of Newsletters
  • PAIS Bulletin; PAIS Select
  • Psychological Abstracts
  • PsycINFO database
  • PsycLIT database
  • Public Administration Abstracts
  • Quality Control and Applied Statistics: An International Literature Digest
  • Sociological Abstracts
  • Standard Periodical Directory
  • Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory
  • University Microfilms, Inc.